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Whether it is a single incident or an ongoing pattern of abuse, sexual assault can undermine a victim's physical and emotional safety.

Effective safety plans empower victims and can help them reclaim a sense of safety and security.

This session provides an overview of the Clery Act's requirements and how the Act influences on- and off-campus response and resources.

Two federal laws—the Jeanne Clery Act and Title IX—influence campus prevention and response to sexual violence.

This session addresses the unique challenges and opportunities inherent in creating a safety plan that meets the specific needs of victims in a campus environment; explores how safety planning for campus victims/survivors may differ from safety planning for domestic violence victims; and discusses strategies for protecting victim privacy, discussing emotional safety, and providing survivor-centered safety planning. Iannarone and Sarah Jones from Covenant House New Jersey, and Shannon Traore from the National Center for Missing & Exploited Youth, discusses the approaches, successes and challenges of family reunification for victims and survivors of human trafficking. This webinar, moderated by OVC Fellow, Kristy Cho, and featuring Amy Fleischauer from the International Institute of Buffalo, Kim Harris from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U. Department of Health and Human Services and Ami Rowland from Covenant House California, discusses the concept and role of person-centered approaches in supporting victim-centered and trauma informed practice and policy.

It considers how family dynamics, trauma, and service provision for both foreign nationals and U. Participants gained information on how outreach, identification, and service provision to victims of trafficking can be positively impacted by implementing strategies that utilize trauma-informed approaches.

Requirements under the federal Clery Act provide a foundation for an institution's campus safety and security policies.

This session features Nadia Swanson, LMSW, Coordinator of Training and Advocacy at the Ali Forney Center and Melissa Brockie, MSW, New Day Center Director at UMOM. P., Child Abuse Pediatrician, Center for Safe and Healthy Families, University of Utah Primary Children's Hospital and Elizabeth Hendrix, M. W., Trafficking in Persons Program Director, Asian Association of Utah. The session highlights how some agencies have forged creative and strategic partnerships with hotel brands, local public housing authorities, and federal agencies to streamline and expand access to emergency and long term shelter resources on behalf of trafficking survivors.A presenter from the Social Security Administration will share the latest on representative payees; an EJI representative will talk about the Elder Abuse Prevention and Prosecution Act and new resources being developed to better respond to elder abuse; an expert from the Administration for Community Living will describe their guardianship grant programs and the importance of data collection for policy and programmatic enhancement; and the Deputy Director of the National Center on Elder Abuse will present on some of the latest trends and resources that will help you to better respond to elder abuse.Learn how victim service providers and academic institutions can create mutually beneficial relationships in which subject matter expertise, learning experiences, data, and best practices are developed, exchanged, and improved upon.This session highlights what is survivor informed programming, how to utilize survivor informed practices in organization programming and how to integrate these practices in case management during a client intake, and short-term and long-term service provision.This session guides participants through a domestic servitude labor trafficking case study.

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